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This is How We (Lobster) Roll

  • 2 min read

A Matter of Opinion

Around here, there's only one way to make a lobster roll- and that's Maine-style! We know Connecticut-style lobster rollers disagree, and to the outsider, the differences may be subtle. We highly advise a taste test, which provides some great eating and is sure to spark some spirited debate.

Here we're sharing our favorite recipes for each version (simple is best!) so you can choose your favorite.  Cooking lobsters is actually pretty easy. The basics involve a large boiling pot of salt water, a headlong plunge (for the lobsters), and 12 minutes from the time the water boils again. An ice-water bath makes them easy to handle and gets you the sweet meat you'll need for these sandwiches. 

If you've never broken down a lobster, you can get pro tips and tricks on cooking and preparing them with Chef Geoff Janowski from Captain Marden's Seafoods here. 

Whichever roll you decide you love, serving them up on some stylish plates and platters makes this simple summertime favorite that much more special. Leave a comment below and let us know your winner!

Maine Lobster Rolls

Ingredients:

  • 4 11/2 lb. lobsters, cooked, cracked and meat removed and cut into 1/2" chunks
  • 1 large celery stalk, minced
  • 1/4 c. plus 2 T. mayonnaise (we prefer Hellman's) 
  • 2 T. lemon juice
  • 2 T. melted butter
  • Boston lettuce leaves
  • 4 split-top hot dog buns (or get fancy with brioche rolls)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: a dash of cayenne pepper, finely minced red onion

Connecticut Lobster Rolls

Ingredients:

  • 4 11/2 lb. lobsters, cooked, cracked and meat removed and cut into 1/2" chunks
  • 1/4 lb. melted butter
  • 4 T. Chopped chives for garnish
  • 4 split-top hot dog buns (or Martin's Potato Rolls)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

 

Preparation:

Maine:

  1. In a skillet over medium heat melt the butter, and toast the buns on both sides until lightly browned.
  2. In a mixing bowl, combine lobster meat with mayonnaise, minced celery, lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste, and cayenne or minced onion if using.
  3. Line the toasted buns with the lettuce leaves and fill with the lobster salad. Garnish with some parsley or a sprinkle of cayenne.
  4. Variations include a host of option for flavoring the mayonnaise in a small bowl: think curry powder, smoked paprika, or a garlicky aioli. Some folks love to add avocado chunks, chopped fresh dill, or diced tomatoes, but purists will prefer the basic combo above which lets the sweet taste of the lobster shine through.

Connecticut:

  1. In a skillet over medium heat melt the butter, and toast the buns on both sides until lightly browned. Lots of debate around what makes the true version of this- we might opt for the potato buns if you can find them. Their sweetness compliments the lobster meat beautifully, and their soft texture is sublime.
  2. Set the buns aside and melt the remaining butter over medium heat, stirring until the butter has turned brown and smells nutty.
  3. Fill the bun with lobster meat, broken up into bite-sized chunks, and drizzle the brown butter over the top. Garnish with chives, and if you're feeling really decadent, dip it in the remaining melted butter.